Archive

Archive for September, 2012

Project to use a Kindle 3 as a display for Raspberry Pi

September 30, 2012 2 comments

This is a great blog on how to use a Kindle 3 as a display for Raspberry Pi

http://projectdp.wordpress.com/

 

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Commands to shut down and reboot your Raspberry Pi

September 30, 2012 1 comment

We all know that you can shutdown your raspberry Pi  by pulling the power cable out of the raspberry Pi or by turning the power supply off at the power switch.

However this can create problems by corrupting you SD card resulting in strange things happening when the Raspberry Pi is running or the Raspberry Pi not turning back on again after you powered it off using the above shutdown method.

To make sure this does not happen to you need to use the following commands

In the GUI

In the GUI left click in the bottom left hand corner on the blue cross  to display the options menu (Like the start button in windows) go to accessories and then left click on LXterminal to display the terminal window

From the terminal window inside the GUI or direct from the command line

Type in the following command to shut down your Raspberry Pi

sudo shutdown or Sudo halt

(we use sudo command for “run as admin” as the standard account is not an admin)

(You can not shutdown or reboot the raspberry pi with a normal account)

Type in the following command to shut down your Raspberry Pi

sudo reboot

(we use sudo command for “run as admin” as the standard account is not an admin)

(You can not shutdown or reboot the raspberry pi with a normal account)

This will then start the shutdown or reboot producer once complete you can then power off your Raspberry Pi

 

How to mount a USB drive to your Raspberry Pi

September 23, 2012 1 comment

Before we can start using our USB drive with the Raspberry PI we must first create a media mount point and then add our USB drive to that media mount point

First we need to find out where our system locates the device. With the USB device not plugged in, type…

tail -f /var/log/messages

This should display the following information seen below

pi@raspberrypi ~ $ tail -f /var/log/messages
Sep 22 16:56:03 raspberrypi kernel: [ 5313.827367] 465 pages in swap cache
Sep 22 16:56:03 raspberrypi kernel: [ 5313.827378] Swap cache stats: add 960, de        lete 495, find 404/419
Sep 22 16:56:03 raspberrypi kernel: [ 5313.827390] Free swap  = 99960kB
Sep 22 16:56:03 raspberrypi kernel: [ 5313.827398] Total swap = 102396kB
Sep 22 16:56:03 raspberrypi kernel: [ 5313.838708] 57344 pages of RAM
Sep 22 16:56:03 raspberrypi kernel: [ 5313.838718] 2745 free pages
Sep 22 16:56:03 raspberrypi kernel: [ 5313.838726] 1940 reserved pages
Sep 22 16:56:03 raspberrypi kernel: [ 5313.838735] 6666 slab pages
Sep 22 16:56:03 raspberrypi kernel: [ 5313.838743] 41974 pages shared
Sep 22 16:56:03 raspberrypi kernel: [ 5313.838752] 465 pages swap cached

Push CTRL+C to return to the command prompt

Plug in your USB drive and run the same command again and you should get the following

pi@raspberrypi ~ $ tail -f /var/log/messages
Sep 23 15:31:58 raspberrypi kernel: [86669.690603] usb 1-1.2: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3
Sep 23 15:31:58 raspberrypi kernel: [86669.690620] usb 1-1.2: Product: Mass Storage
Sep 23 15:31:58 raspberrypi kernel: [86669.690632] usb 1-1.2: Manufacturer: Generic
Sep 23 15:31:58 raspberrypi kernel: [86669.690643] usb 1-1.2: SerialNumber: A17D7C6A
Sep 23 15:31:58 raspberrypi kernel: [86669.692950] scsi0 : usb-storage 1-1.2:1.0
Sep 23 15:31:59 raspberrypi kernel: [86670.688882] scsi 0:0:0:0: Direct-Access           8.07 PQ: 0 ANSI: 2
Sep 23 15:31:59 raspberrypi kernel: [86670.694385] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] 3790848 512-byte logical blocks: (1.94 GB/1.80 GiB)
Sep 23 15:31:59 raspberrypi kernel: [86670.694973] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Write Protect is off
Sep 23 15:31:59 raspberrypi kernel: [86670.751906]  sda: sda1
Sep 23 15:31:59 raspberrypi kernel: [86670.755898] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Attached SCSI removable disk

You should notice new lines which appear, make a note of the ID – it will be something like sda1, sdb1, which means our usb drive is located in /dev/sda1 (highlighted in bold)

Push CTRL+C to return to the command prompt

Now we need to create a media mount point for our USB drive

sudo mkdir /media/(whatever you want to name it)

(we use sudo command for “run as admin” as the standard account is not a admin)

Example (sudo mkdir /media/USBdrive)

After making the media mount point we now need to add the USBdrive.

by running the following command

sudo mount -t vfat -o uid=pi,gid=pi /dev/(ID number) /media/(media mount point)/

(we use sudo command for “run as admin” as the standard account is not a admin)

Example (sudo mount -t vfat -o uid=pi,gid=pi /dev/sda1 /media/usbdrive)

You have now successfully added your USBdrive to your Raspberry Pi

To view the contents of your USB drive run the following command

cd /media/usbstick

(to change to the USBdrive now mounted on media mount point)

and then

ls -l

(to display the contents of USBdrive)

It is important to note that this example is based on a usb pen drive connect directly to raspberry pi, This may changed when using a usb hub.

If you are having issues getting your USB device to work it may require more power then the raspberry pi can give which in that case may require you to power the USB device from a separate power source.

Simple Webcam Viewer Software for Windows 7

September 18, 2012 1 comment

*Since posting this blog there is now a updated version click on the link below*

Webcam viewer software updated to version v2-2

At work today I needed a quick bit of software to test that a webcam was working without installing the complete webcam software on the PC.

If you use windows XP you know that you can test the webcam is working under “My Computer” unfortunately this helpful option was removed from windows 7

So after a quick google search I found this handy software from Bust a Tech software

http://www.bustatech.com/webcamviewer-a-simple-viewer-for-webcam/

From the Website of Bust a Tech

WebcamViewer is a very simple click-and-run application, where you don’t have to install the application. Simply download the exe file and run the exe file to use the software. You can store it inside your harddisk or you can carry it in your pendrive, and run it on any PC you want.

WebcamViewer – View you webcam on window 7

Software can be downloaded from the following link – WebcamViewer V1.0.zip

Can the raspberry Pi be used in an office environment?

September 16, 2012 1 comment

The question was posed this weekend could the raspberry pi be used in an office environment ?

The answer I discovered is it could as long as you know exactly what you are asking of the raspberry pi see below a raspberry pi being used to access windows 7.

With the help of the following project Raspberry Pi Thin Client project you can convert your raspberry pi to a thin client system and run citrix receiver or VMWareView Client to access your company’s software.

The software can be downloaded from here  – RPi-TC Download

Advantages of deploying the raspberry pi to the IT estate of a company could included

  1. The Raspberry pi can be purchased for as low as £35 each (included the cost of Pi, Sd Card, HDMI converter, Pi case), drastically lowering deployment costs when compared to a PC environment
  2. Require lower ongoing expenditures and administrative costs
  3. Raspberry pi  also use anywhere from 3,5 watts of power, compared to 150 watts for a normal PC
  4. Security benefits there is no company data is on the raspberry pi
  5. Save on desk space the raspberry pi can be mounted to the TFT

VESA mount for the Raspberry Pi from Solarbotics

The VESA mount from Solarbotics for the can be purchased from here – http://www.solarbotics.com/product/60103/

How to install Wifi on a Raspberry Pi

September 13, 2012 1 comment

Take a look at this handy little blog which shows you how to install Wifi on a Raspberry Pi

http://dembtech.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/how-to-install-wifi-on-raspberry-pi.html

University of Southampton engineers a Raspberry Pi Supercomputer

September 12, 2012 2 comments

University of Southampton have built a supercomputer from 64 Raspberry Pi computers and Lego.

University of Southampton have built a supercomputer from 64 Raspberry Pi computers and Lego

http://www.southampton.ac.uk/mediacentre/features/raspberry_pi_supercomputer.shtml

If you want to build your own Raspberry Pi Supercomputer you can also follow the steps here Raspberry Pi Supercomputer (html).

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